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They will never take our pasties
 
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Scottish Republican



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 6:03 pm    Post subject: They will never take our pasties Reply with quote

Devon tries to steal Cornwall's national dish (as they've already tried to pinch its flag and language)...

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/5/20090430/tod-cornwall-gets-nasty-over-devon-s-pas-870a197.html

Quote:
Cornwall Gets Nasty Over Devon's Pasty Prize
5 hours 12 mins ago

Cornwall Gets Nasty Over Devon's Pasty Prize

The decision prompted anger among bakers in Cornwall, who said that firms from the neighbouring county [country?!] should be barred from entering the competition.

An appeal to disqualify the winners, Chunk of Devon, failed. Some Cornish bakers are now threatening to boycott next year's ceremony.

Chunk was given the top prize at the inaugural British Pie Awards ceremony last week.

Matthew O'Callaghan, the chairman of the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie Association, who organised the competition, admitted that to have been eligible, pasties should have been made in Cornwall.

"There was supposed to be a disclaimer on the application form which stated all entrants to the Cornish Pasty competition must come from Cornwall," he said.

"It wasn't done and I have to admit it was an administrative cock-up."

Mr O'Callaghan said that while Chunk would keep its award because there had been an "honest mistake", next year the rules would be made much clearer.

The judges praised the Chunk pasty's taste, appearance, texture, size, pastry and local ingredients.

But, traditionalists say that to be worthy of the name, a Cornish pasty must have been made on the correct side of the River Tamar.

Ann Muller, of the Lizard Pasty Shop, said: "Why do they want to call their pasties Cornish? They're happy to call their cream teas Devonshire and we've got Cornish cream teas.

"Let them put their pasties into a competition but call it a Devonshire pasty. Don't forget where the border is."

Managing Director of Chunk, Simon Bryon-Edmond, defended his firm's right to the title, and accused Cornish rivals of complacency.

"It seems the Cornish may have got a bit podgy round the waist when it comes to pasty-making and have been relaxing and rather resting on their laurels," Mr Bryon-Edmond said.

"We were the underdogs in the competition but we know our pasty is a winner.

"All of our ingredients are free range and locally sourced, and there are no additives whatsoever. We also use butter rather than margarine.

"We like everything to be as natural as possible. The recipe is no great secret. We use the best ingredients and the best herbs and spices."

Debate over the origins of the pasty has long raged between the two counties.

In 2006 Todd Gray, a historian, discovered a shopping list written in Devon in 1510 which referred to ingredients to make pasties.

However, Les Merton, the author of the Official Encyclopedia of the Cornish Pasty, argued that cave drawings show that pasties, wrapped in leaves rather than pastry, were eaten in Cornwall as early as 8,000BC.

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Scottish Republican



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 6:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
In 2006 Todd Gray, a historian, discovered a shopping list written in Devon in 1510 which referred to ingredients to make pasties.


And? It wouldn't actually be a Cornish pasty would it?

Scotland has its own pasties - bridies, they're called - but no one pretends that they're Cornish pasties!
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Abieuan



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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2009 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BBC Radio Scotland picked this one up, i heard it on the Newsdrive programme on Thursday 30th, Ann Muller was interviewed.
You can still listen to it on i player newsdrive
Fastforward to 23 mins and the article lasts four and a half minutes.
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Shaz



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Location: Kernow


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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2009 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ann is the pasty queen, I'd say her pasties are one of the best, she lives just down the road from us, I'd bet she was mad, can't listen to it at the moment because I'm on a dongel with a very weak signal.
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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2009 7:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stupid question, has the Cornish pasty been "copyrighted" yet?

What I mean is that Scotch whisky HAS to come from Scotland, Champagne from the region of the same name, and Parmesan from Parma (?) - has the same been done for the Cornish pasty?
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PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2009 12:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not according to this...

Quote:
In 2002, Cornish Pasty Association, the trade organisation for pasty making in Cornwall submitted an application to the UK governments Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) to obtain Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status for the Cornish pasty. DEFRA has confirmed that it is backing the application and will be sending it to the European Commission for final approval. If PGI status is granted to the Cornish pasty (the same status that has been granted to Champagne, Parma Ham, Stilton Cheese, Arbroath Smokies, Cornish Clotted Cream, and many other items of regional produce) it would mean only pasty makers based in Cornwall who make in a traditional manner and follow a traditional recipe will be able to label their products as Cornish pasties.


Pasty on Wiki

But it was 2002
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 Random Information. 
 1549 - War between Cornish and English... The 5th, the final engagment came, the rebels (Cornish) were outmanoevred and surrounded, and great was the slaughter and cruel was the fight, and such was the valour and stoutness of these men that the Lord Grey reported himself that he never in all the wars that he had been did he know the like. The Devonshire men went north up the valley of the Exe, where they were overtaken and cut to pieces by Sir Gawen Carew, who left the corpses of their leaders, hanging on gibbets from Dunster to Bath.  


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