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Bernard Moffatt on Max radio
 
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Shaz



Joined: 05 Apr 2007
Posts: 702
Location: Kernow


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 4:09 pm    Post subject: Bernard Moffatt on Max radio Reply with quote

Quote:
Interview with Bernard Moffatt (Celtic League's Director of Information) and Manx Radio. Aired on the Mandate programme on 21 July 2009. Mr Moffatt talks about the League's proposal for a Celtic Council.


Video here


Bernard Moffatt sounds like a scouser
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Scottish Republican



Joined: 11 Apr 2007
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Bernard Moffatt sounds like a scouser


That's what most Manx folk sound like now. Although there are plenty of Cornish who have English accents too, of the "Estwee Ingwish" variety, including some of those in MK!

The old Manx accent sounded as if it came from somewhere in Scotland or Ireland, but is pretty much extinct. They started with the Scouse sound with all the English holidaymakers coming in, and because the main transport links are to there.

I hate to say it, but the Scouse-isms have even crept into the pronounciation of the Manx language, features which are almost certainly not indigenous and authentic Gaelic, like "a"s being pronounced "aeh", and the "r" being dropped at the end of a syllable like the English do. I have pointed this out to some Manx and they've told me it's just because I'm a Scotsman and "roll my 'r's" - erm, no! Rolling Eyes The South East English pronounce the word "farmer" as "fahmah", with no "r" sound at all in it. In Scottish and Irish Gaelic, this is not the case at all, nor was it in the dialects of Northern England until some point late last century... or in North Wales. In other words, this was never a traditional feature of language around the Irish Sea.

Conclusion? It's a modern feature. Probably introduced via Northern England, as the accents there got watered down, or by the broadcast media.
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Abieuan



Joined: 06 Apr 2007
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 09, 2009 7:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was quite surprised to hear him, when speaking of the language contacts of the Scottish highlands and Nova Scotia, pronounce Gàidhlig as gaylik (which is Irish) instead of galik which is Scottish and spoken in Nova Scotia too.
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